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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 16, 2017 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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i'm ben brown. the headlines at seven. anger and frustration as protesters storm kensington and chelsea town hall. they're demanding answers as to why grenfell tower went up in flames. it looks like people are actually trying to get in to the council to make their point directly. we are in the richest borough in the uk, and in this borough, we have a building where the poorest people live, and the safety measures were completely inadequate. police confirm 30 people are now known to have died in the fire. the bbc understands more than 70 are dead or missing. the prime minister — already criticised for her response — visits some of the injured in hospital. she's announced a £5 million fund to help the victims. what we need to do is to ensure that immediately people have the support that they need in order to deal with what is an horrific
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and terrible circumstance that people are in. and the queen and prince william visit a relief centre where some of the hundreds left homeless are staying in temporary accommodation. good evening and welcome to bbc news. police say that at least thirty people are now confirmed to have died in the fire that engulfed grenfell tower in west london. the bbc understands that the total number of people who are dead or missing so far is around 70. there is growing anger at the way the authorities have dealt with the aftermath of the fire — earlier this afternoon around 500
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hundred protestors stormed kensington town hall. the queen and prince william have been visiting a relief centre which has been helping victims of the fire. our first report tonight — on the latest on the tower block fire, is from our correspondent jeremy cooke. a crowd storms kensington town hall, demanding action. we wantjustice, we wantjustice. demanding justice. and demanding answers. we need to be heard. we have things to say. we are in pain. i understand that the response we get from the council is not satisfactory. how could this tragedy have happened, on this scale,
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in this city, in 2017? the whole procedure is chaos. we are sent from hospital to hospital. why is there not community hope for family members? why do we have to actively look for them and be given misinformation, be told they are possibly alive, making us call family members? we live in the modern world. why is it carried out like this? it doesn't make sense. today, again, in the shadow of grenfell tower, a different kind of response. it is an overwhelming community tragedy with an overwhelming community response. we get all the missing people on the same window. a continuing grassroots mobilisation, doing all that they can. and visited today by royalty.
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a time to reflect and to thank. you guys do a brilliantjob. but the queen and prince william left in no doubt of the agony and the grief here. royal protocol meets raw emotion. william, come here. where are the children? the queen turning up, everyone came. go to the media, show the queen you are nice, show the smiles. but you are not doing the rightjob. could you tell us who they are? not my daughters. families, friends. not my children, my family's friends. not necessarily my children. rescue crews are still making their way through the building.
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it is hard to imagine a more challenging task. dangerous and slow work. it is why the official death toll remains so much lower than what the people here expect, and what they fear. the building itself is in a very hazardous state. it is going to take a period of time for our specialists, both from the police and the london fire brigade, to fully search the building, to make sure we locate and recover everybody that has sadly perished in that fire. we will be doing that as swiftly as we can, absolutely. i completely understand the need for those that have lost loved ones that, as quick as we can, we are able to confirm that. with all of that comes frustration and the sense among many that more help is needed at the official level. there is a woman on the train who goes past and she sees body bags. loads of them.
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why are they lying? even if you can't identify them, don't lie. say, we have this many bodies unidentified. because there are people out here looking for their family and friends. we have not met anyone from the council who has come here and spoken to anyone. the mp came here on wednesday for about five minutes but we haven't seen anyone who has even come in and speak to any of the local people who have been affected, which is really annoying. you need some engagement. yes. we haven't got any of that. all we have is people coming to volunteer, to do this and that, drop things off, but we haven't seen anyone in authority who we can give some responsibility to. they are not bringing out the truth, man. they need to talk the truth and get real. theresa may comes down and doesn't see none of us. when it was manchester, she was all about the place. no truth. they have always been wanting to do something like this to ladbroke grove.
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and now something is done, it would be nice if something was done properly to help us. the investigations, inquests and enquiries will take perhaps years to complete but the people here believe they already have a fundamental understanding of this tragedy, that the fire swept through the building at breathtaking pace, and that so many people from this neighbourhood have lost their lives. away from the crowds, it is now three days on. the fire is out and london rumbles on. grenfell tower, 127 homes, stands monument now to the lives, to the families who have been lost. jeremy cooke, bbc news, north kensington. 0ur correspondent dan johnson is outside kensington hall in west london. there was a big protest earlier on.
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we saw some of the protesters storming inside the building. raw grief and anger as well. absolute frustration and a furious response from a lot of these people. they came here to give a list of demands to the council. things that they say just haven't been done quickly enough. they want reassurances that people will be given somewhere to live temporarily and that they can get a reassurance that they will be re—homed longer term in this borough. they don't want people to be moved further afield. they want confirmation of how many people have died. they say the investigation and the work by authorities is taking too long. they know they are missing family members, missing for three days now. they know they are dead but still don't have official confirmation. they say that without
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that they can't properly grieve. a big crowd really gathered. they decided they were going to take their message to the leaders of kensington and chelsea council. they forced their way in and stood for a time in the reception area. some went up to the first—floor offices where they seen officials at the windows. they wanted to give their response in person. police officers held them back and eventually pushed them out of the building. the protesters remained outside the building foran houror protesters remained outside the building for an hour or two, calling forjustice. building for an hour or two, calling for justice. saying that building for an hour or two, calling forjustice. saying that they needed more information from the authorities and more action from the council. they said that they needed to see the money getting through urgently to see the money getting through urge ntly to to see the money getting through urgently to the people who need it right now. in the last half hour, the protesters have all moved off in one big demonstration down
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kensington high street. we assume that they are now having back to the tower itself. the police still guarding the council offices, making sure they are secure. the council can be in no doubt that the people are dissatisfied with response. the council have said that they have given people money and accommodation temporarily, and in the long—term they will re—homed people close to this borough, ideally within the borough. people are saying that they wa nt borough. people are saying that they want a proper independent enquiry into the refurbishment of the tower last year. some are saying that they don't have confidence in a public enquiry ordered by the government. a lot of frustration. some of it did boil over but in the main it was a calm protest with a strong message that people here want things to change. dan johnson, thank
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that people here want things to change. danjohnson, thank you very much indeed. at the town hall throughout the afternoon watching those demonstrations. politicians from all parties — the prime minister in particular — are facing a barrage of criticism from local people over how they've responded to the fire. many feel their voices have been ignored for years. today the local government secretary sajid javid promised that — whatever recommendations are made by safety experts — including rehousing people living in other tower blocks — they will be done. in the last hour the prime minister has been speaking to my colleague emily maitless — let's hear what she had to say. what i want to talk about today is what the government is making available to the victims of this absolutely horrific tragedy. i think we were all, when we saw the horrific scenes of what had happened at grenfell tower, we all were deeply affected by that. it's absolutely horrifying and i've been hearing stories today from people about their experiences. i've also been hearing from the local community
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about the issues and concerns that they have. the government is making £5 million available for those emergency funds for people who need just to get money to be able to buy the normal things of everyday life. this morning, i was in one of the hospitals meeting some of the victims there and one of the women said to me, basically, she ran out of this grenfell tower in a t—shirt and a pair of knickers. she has nothing. that's why the government is putting in that funding. there are other things we will do as well to provide funding for people, support to ensure they are housed within three weeks, but immediately we need to help them. the public want to hear you say, this is terrible, this is ourfault and we accept responsibility? something terrible has happened.
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this was a terrible fire that took place, people have lost their lives, people have had their homes destroyed, they have fled for their lives with absolutely nothing. can you accept that you miss read the public mood on this one, you must read the anger that people feel about this? they shouted "coward" at you this afternoon when you left saint clement's church. what i have done since this took place is festival yesterday checked that the emergency services had the support they needed in order to carry on with theirjob... prime minister, this is friday evening. the people needed these things in place on wednesday. there were people we spoke to who were housed for one night, didn't know where they were going there next night, had no money to spend on food and were not told anything by anyone. no one was in charge. what i have done today is ensured that we as a government putting funding in place for people in the area. this has been an absolutely terrifying experience. where are they going to be housed?
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it has been a terrifying experience for people. when i have heard stories, i heard stories from the emergency services yesterday and that is why i ordered a public enquiry as soon as i got back to downing street. we will make sure that takes place as soon as possible. this was preventable, wasn't it? in 2013, a coroner put safety recommendations which included putting sprinklers in every building editor was never done. 0ne sort of padding would have been fireproof as it cost £2 more. but that £2 not have been worth spending? we are yet to ascertain
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because the blaze. they could have spent £2 more on cladding. the fire service are looking at were because of the fire was, and it's important that we get to the of this. in 2013, you were in government and a coroner said, you can stop this with the sprinklers system in every block. and the government has taken action on the recommendations of the coroner's report. but what we need to do in reaction to this incident, to this horrifying fire, is to get to the bottom of why this fire took place, what happened, why did it spread so unexpectedly at voraciously and so quickly. there are 4000 other high—rise blocks, there are many, many other residents tonight wondering what kind of precautions you will take. when will you be able to tell them they are safe when they go to sleep in their beds? the government is doing everything in its power to ensure that they are safe. we have identified those buildings and now and over the weekend, people are going in and inspecting those buildings. we will do everything in our power to make sure people are safe. that was the prime minister speaking to my colleague emily maitless. 0ur deputy political editor john pienaar has been looking into the political questions that need to be answered
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in the light of this tragedy. murderers! they killed people! sorrow turned to rage. this tragedy has become a cause. we want the answers! we want them now! today, protesters demanded help, answers, and justice. clothing for those who have lost everything poured in. too much to handle, too much to use. all of it piling pressure on the government to learn the lessons of grenfell tower and stop it happening again. theresa may was back, this time, unlike last time, seeing victims in hospital. while ministers promised to do everything, anything they could to identify buildings at risk and make them and the people inside safe. we will do whatever it takes. we will take the expert advice, do whatever it takes to make those building safe, or make those people safe. whatever it takes. we have to be led by the experts. but there can be no short cuts to this. but making this kind of loss, this kind of horror the last we will see,
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means thousands of blocks must be inspected, millions of pounds in work and who knows how many moved to safety. here, they are busy helping now, demanding action from politicians about as quickly. so, within the space of a few hours, theresa may and two cabinet ministers have been in the area, just a day after the prime minister was criticised for failing to meet and hear directly from people caught up in the tragedy. whether or not they are trying to make up for lost time, to demonstrate their concern, they are under pressure. people here want answers and they want action. are you blaming politicians? or is itjust theirjob to do something about it now? 0r both? i think there's more than politicians to be blamed. i think architecture, all of it. they are all involved, they are all to blame. they are all blaming each other. somebody has got to answer for it. the community, we are managing. there is no single politician or civilian who can come forward to take responsibility.
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try and stop people from coming into london and, you know, profiteering from building huge complexes, million pound properties and ghettoising the people who don't have that sort of money into properties that are not maintained and not looked after. the london mayor is adding to demands. it's really important we are not left waiting for two, three, four years before we get answers. we need answers now. i'm asking for an interim response to the enquiry this summer. enough is enough. 0ne minister made a surprise visit. the reaction was predictable. because of people saving money, people are dying. that is why it will be so important to get to the bottom of what happened. it going to take far too long for people here. we're on the verge of some serious anger in the streets. and i absolutely understand it. more fury outside a church tonight
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visited by the prime minister. the anger won't fade away quickly. nothing will be quite enough. the weakened prime minister struggling to keep pace with a new crisis. let's talk to our political correspondent eleanor garnier who is in westminsterfor us. 0ffering £5 million fund to immediately help the victims. theresa may was criticised when she went to west london. she was called coward and people shouted shame on you. when she spoke to emergency services, she faced criticism for not having spoken directly to some of the victims. the government says it is providing £5 million of emergency money to provide supplies,
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food, clothes, anything that those who've been directly affected need, having lost everything they own. the government has announced a judge led independent enquiry to look at exactly what went wrong. there is no doubt the government and theresa may are under pressure. they need to make sure the public enquiry provides recommendations quickly and puts them into action. theresa may is facing lots of questions and it is facing lots of questions and it is true to say that it is the incumbent government facing questions currently but also true to say that the questions will go back not just over this say that the questions will go back notjust over this government, the last government but perhaps back to previous administration is as well. theresa may has been saying that she has spoken directly to some of the victims who she saw in hospital today. receiving treatment in west
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london. she says she has heard some of the horror stories of exactly what happened to them. some telling her that they fled the building in just the clothes that they were wearing. she is clearly trying to show some of the empathy that some of her critics believe was lacking previously. clearly, the government saying that we are doing everything we can to provide everything, this emergency fund, but we also heard from communities secretary sajid javid who was addressing the issue of other tower blocks similar to the high—rise tower block in west london up high—rise tower block in west london up and down the country saying that local authorities and fire authorities across the country were doing checks to make sure and reassure residents in those tower blocks that they are safe. they hope the audit will be completed today. sajid javid saying that no cost will be too much. they will provide whatever is needed. if people need
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rehousing, if building work is needed, he said that work would be done. clearly the government trying to get back on the front foot in responding to this crisis. theresa may also holding that meeting earlier this afternoon. downing street sources stressing that was looking at how the victims are being supported in what is clearly now a recovery phase. eleanor, andrew much indeed. —— thank you very much indeed. well, as we've been hearing dozens of people are still missing. many families are searching for information, trying to find out what happened to their loved ones. more heartbreaking stories are emerging about last phone calls and messages from people who were trapped their homes. sarah campbell reports now on the victims, and those still missing. viewers may find this distressing. with each day, the number of people dead or feared to have died increases.
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the scale of the loss of life is almost impossible to comprehend. confirmed today, khadija saye, who was 2a years old. she was a promising young artist. the mp david lammy, a friend, tweeted: "i mourn the tragic loss of a wonderful young woman". former colleagues feared the worst, after reading her final tweets about thick smoke in the 20th floor flat she shared with her mother. khadija was the whole package. she had everything going for her. she had a beautiful soul, she was a kind person, she was always volunteering, always looking out for other people, buddying younger people. she was very passionate about her own community and a hugely talented, creative artist. her photography and her art speak for themselves. she really had a massive future ahead of her, and she'll be hugely missed by all of us. two other victims have been named so far. five—year—old isaac shawo, his mother described him as a "beautiful boy". and mohammad alhajali, a 23—year—old syrian refugee. once i asked him, why are you studying civil engineering?
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he laughed and said, because i want to go back to syria when the war is over, and help rebuild the country. he said, they will need us. this is the kind of person he was. this wall has become a focal point for the community, a place for people to leave tributes, to write down messages, and express their thoughts and feelings about what happened. it's also a place where, even today, family members and friends have posted pictures of those they desperately want to hear from. what do i expect? well, i'm hoping, basically, they are in the hospital. even if it means they are unconscious, but they are in hospital, that's what i'm hoping. i feel angry, i feel sad, i feel everything. i miss my friend, my friend is inside, but i can't do anything. she's there, but i can't help her. i saw her the same day before she died. morning and afternoon, but... no—one helped her.
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the wait for news goes on for family after family. mo khalil spent much of his day putting up pictures of his uncle hesham rahman, who lived on the 20th floor. we don't know, we don't know. kind of, empty feeling that we've all got. we don't really know anything, we've got no answers. we are alljust looking at each other, hoping that we find them. 0rfind something. it will take time, but there will be many more names to add to the list of the dead. many more families left in grief. sarah campbell, bbc news. let's talk now to psychologist richard reid — one of the uk's leading trauma experts about how the grenfell tower fire may have affected residents and those who were witness to what happened. those who survived what happened as
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well. thank you for being with us. anyone who got out of that block alive is going to be deeply traumatised. absolutely. people are trying to deal with their practical needs and there is a lot of uncertainty. people are trying to fill in the gaps as to what happened and find relatives and neighbours. when that settles down, we might see the full emotional impact start to come out. that's an emotional impact that can last for months or even yea rs ? that can last for months or even years? in most cases, up to about two thirds of instances, people's reactions start to settle down after a few days or weeks. for the other third, they need to be careful because it can become entrenched and get worse as time goes on. we know from previous disasters and
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tragedies there is survivor guilt. those who managed to get out, separated from friends and families and who survived but loved ones didn't. they feel terrible guilt. even those who survived the event will be picked psychologically because they will be thinking about what could have been. there will also be an element of vicarious trauma for others as well. people who may not have been living in the flats, those who have been supporting or even living nearby, thinking about their own situation. particularly people who live in tower blocks. what kind of help could be on offer and would help people? more than anything, it's about making people physically co mforta ble about making people physically comfortable and giving them basic tools to calm their emotional reactions. most importantly, at this stage, people
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reactions. most importantly, at this stage, - people what we call stage, giving people what we call psycho education. warnings about typical responses to these types of abnormal situations. lots of people will be feeling very uncomfortable but in most cases it will be an abnormal situation with a normal reaction to it. explaining that might take some anxiety away but also give some as to might take some anxiety away but also give some - as to what also give some pointers as to what to look out for in themselves and other people. it's very easy for the effect of trauma to creep up on people without them realising it. they have people looking out for tell—tale signs, then they have more chance of being referred to people who can help them. you have with very different experience with very different tragedies. the victims, would they display symptoms tragedies. the victims, would they display - symptoms of trauma? display similar symptoms of trauma? absolutely. - big thing about
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absolutely. the big thing about these type of situations, whether it “£55 ‘éri ""5"‘“‘3”“"‘5’§§“5‘“5f :‘ travelling to work on a train, fire in the block where you live. a fire in the block where you live. those are not situations where you expect a dangerous scenario. would expect a dangerous scenario. they are we take for they are situations we take for granted or until something goes wrong. be part of the brain that goes to deal with the trauma finds it hard to make sense of that. you we re it hard to make sense of that. you were talking to people who witnessed what happened, obviously, images of people throwing themselves from the building or at windows, waving flags and so on to get attention. that will have been and for will have been traumatic. and for the firefighters possibly, who intend —— who went in there very bravely might need psychological help. my organisation is offering
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qgfisle help free of charge if they them help free of charge if they needed. we - forget about the needed. we often forget about the emergency services. we - it is emergency services. we think it is theirjob. they will theirjob. although they will have had of theirjob. although they will have had - of training, something like bee leee e!‘ “elfilfié eff-emits] uee eee leee e!‘ uelfilfié eff-emits] uee is fiiee leee e!‘ ueit’iit’iej eeeiewiieq liee is out eee leee et tteifiifie eeeieteieq liee is out of the eee lete et tteieitie eeeieteieq liee is out of the normal for them. this is oulofltholmam listened to an interview earlier. i listened to an interview earlier. they had to adapt after hearing the! had to adagt after hearing like the of the! had to adagt after hearing like the - of children this is that screaming. this is something that could remain i months and years could remain for months and_yea& the event. thank you very much indeed. so, you are offering really, free of charge, help to people who need that help help—l’qpeqplq whgrneec! that, hel-p ‘if help—l’qpeqplq whgrneec! that, hel-p if they are not able psychologically if they are not able to it psychologically if they are not able to - it somewhere rows. that's to find it somewhere rows. that's very good of you and very good to very good of yoo and very good to very good of yod and very good to to you as well. thank you very very good of yod and very good to of you as well. thank you very very good of yod and very good to of youras well. thank you very very good of yod and very good to of your as we let's ink you very very good of yod and very good to of your as we let's just ou very very good of yod and very good to of your as we let's just show ry much of your time. let's just show some pictures now from near you some pictures now from near g re nfell tower you some pictures now from near grenfell tower this evening. this is of. police cordons close by
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one of the police cordons close by and you can see, well we saw earlier at kensington town hall, t 2’ t j ' % there t 'jt t j ' % there were people t tjt t j t % there were people gathering protest, there were people gathering on the streets there with placards, again, you can see on the streets there with placards, again, you can see some on the streets there with placards, again, you can see some of the placards that are carrying. there we re placards that are carrying. there were a few scuffles earlier on that were a few scuffles earlier on that we we re were a few scuffles earlier on that we were reporting and at kensington town hall when some of the people, very angry, town hall when some of the people, very angry, were town hall when some of the people, very angry, were - to come into very angry, were trying to come into the building, they were scuffling with the police a little bit as they we re with the police a little bit as they were trying to get up the stairs. and they are chanting now, you can see there in the shadow of grenfell tower, demanding answers as to tower. demanding answers as to howi tragedy could have happened. i this tragedy could have happened. i think our correspondent is there at the scene. mark, can you tell us what is going on? then, the protest
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has just what is going on? then, the protest hasjust come down what is going on? then, the protest has just come down here to the shadow of grenfell tower, just suddenly, sorry, tripping over barriers here, and - we have barriers here, and actually we have just come through the cordons into... sorry, there are quite a lot of people trying to come through into the press area so i will move to be left to ensure the barriers are in place. you can see a lot of people here, certainly a few hundred, a couple of thousand possibly. and they are shouting, justice, now. this is the same kind of anger that you saw outside the kensington municipal offices, the offices, little earlier this borodgh offices. little earlieltth they are being held afterrijeenj, theijiare being helerr , , ~ — ~ , the police barricade here, behind the police barricade here, just one bottle they are thrown towards the police. you can see that the poster, despite tory rule, so there is a real sense of anger here against the government about the
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policies being enacted and also about theresa may's response to this tragedy. you saw earlier that when she went to visit some residents at} church, residents from groenefeld who were == from iisremieiiii tower who were —— from grenfell tower who were resting there, she was out the side of tower who were resting there, she was - out the side of the into a intoa car, into a car, i a real church into a car, so a real sense of the hostility if church into a car, so a real sense of the hostility - if we can of the hostility there. if we can just come through, sorry... mark, we will just let you move just come through, sorry... mark, we willjust let you move around there because i know it can be tricky. but i want to show you another demonstration which is just getting underway. this is in central london andi underway. this is in central london
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and i think it's powell mall, actually, where these demonstrators are protesting and they too have placards. you can see the banners that they justice for grenfell tower that they jostice for greafell tm what is really the start, one and what is really the start, one senses, the campaign to get answers as to - happened and how this as to what happened and how this tragedy could possibly have and people have heard that happened. and people have heard that there is to be a full enquiry but still want there is to be a full enquiry but still wa nt a nswers there is to be a full enquiry but still want answers and they they still want answers and they wa nt a nswe rs very they still want answers and they want answers very quickly about how and why the complaints of residence about the lack of fire prevention facilities that grenfell tower, as they saw it, lack of sprinklers, lack of smoke alarms and so on, why their complaints were not listened to by the and if: i; jr ii, ifielllmii. can see those protesters walking quite briskly there through central london and two
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demonstrations and we earlier run the real ferocious saw earlier run the real ferocious anger of some of these protesters when they- in, surged into when they went in, surged into kensington town hall. there were briefly some scuffles inside. let's go back to mark at the demonstration briefly some scuffles inside. let's go ithey‘re liark at the demonstration briefly some scuffles inside. let's go ithey‘re right at the demonstration briefly some scuffles inside. let's go ithey‘re right in the demonstration briefly some scuffles inside. let's go ithey‘re right in the shadow:ration briefly some scuffles inside. let's go ithey‘re right in the shadow oftion and they're right in the shadow of tower as the sun is grenfell tower as the sun is behind you that, mark, but if you can hear me, we have two now, me, we have two demonstrations now, one in the centre of london, one exactly where you - right next to exactly where you are, right next to where the disaster what where the disaster happened. what sort of thing are these protesters sert ef thine are these eretesters —— — —— —— r— — — that sert et thihe are these eretesters —— — —— —— r— — — that they want, apart from saying that they want, apart from a nswe rs saying that they want, apart from answers obviously as to why it happened? they - a - quicker happened? they want a much quicker to find out exactly who or enquiry to find out exactly who or what was behind this tragedy. if there was - responsibility on there was criminal responsibility on there was criminal responsibility on the part of the suppliers of all the of the cladding, they will purchases of the cladding, they will wa nt purchases of the cladding, they will want accountability. these people
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here certainly do not feel placated herecertaintyaor not feel ptacated the herecertainlyaor not feel placated the £5 million fund that theresa by the £5 million fund that theresa may announced today in terms of an response. but also, i emergency response. but also, i think it goes deeper than that, into a deep hostility now against the government. clearly these are protesters as well anti—government protesters as well as people who have been angered by this specific tragedy. let me just lg ican get lg i can get hold of one of the if i can get hold of one of the protesters to ask. hi, what's your name? is that? tell us why you are here today. you with bbc. we are here today. you with. bbcswe age = today because you can see a here today because you can see a tragedy - happened but there has tragedy has happened but there has beena tragedy has happened but there has been a lot of speculation that it been a lot of soeculatiomthatelt not an accident. it was covered was not an accident. it was covered in highly flammable cladding when were 600 i-eole were 600 iieole in there, in there were 600 people in there, in an known there were 600 people in there, in an - known as notting there were 600 people in there, in an- known as notting hill and an area known as notting hill and ladbroke when
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an area known as notting hill and ladbroke - when the an area known as notting hill and ladbroke when the is ladbroke grove, when the area is being regenerated, - know, i can't being regenerated, you know, i can't even move my wife and kids down. they are saying we have to wait 11 years to get a council house, which is such years to get a council house, which is - such a surprise when you is not such a surprise when you are selling off all our council houses for private housing. and i feel like for private housing. and iieellike set it up, . be honest. even they set it up, to be honest. even on portobello road, people can't on portobello road. peopletanl to buy anything there. we afford to buy anything there. we have just come down to represent the people, because we feel like this was corporate manslaughter, that this wasn't an accident. they set up this wasn't an aceidente they sates flammable this wasn't an aceidente they seteo flammable block, they pertain no the flammable block, they pertain no safety measures. corbyn applied the flammable block, they pertain no safe separate res. corbyn appliedfozr the flammable block, they pertain no safe separate measures 1 appliedfozr the flammable block, they pertain no safe separate measures 16 be ied for the flammable block, they pertain no safe separate measures 1 e be put foer the flammable block, they pertain no safe separate measures1e be put in, two separate measures to be put in, both turned down by the tories on two occasions, both turned down by the tories on two - occasions, neglected by two separate occasions, neglected by theresa may. now, many lives have been taken and it's not 30. it's a lot more than that. it - take genius to - at the block and that out. zak, thank you... work that out. zak, thank you... also, they spent £10 million to refurbish this. they spend that money because it was an eyesore to
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the - people. but if they spent the rich people. but if they spent £2 50 extra per panel, they could have got the one that was fire resistant. and that is a reference, that £2, two reports that the type of cladding that was used here at g re nfell tower of cladding that was used here at grenfell tower had a plastic core that was £2 cheaper per panel and the mineral call, more fireproof cladding that apparently was on offer. a lot of questions still about the kind of architectural faults, the structural faults that may have been behind this tragedy, and you can sense the anger here thatis and you can sense the anger here that is spreading throughout this anger and fear as well amongst area. anger and fear as well amongst other residents of other high—rise other residents of other highrtlse well. the government has towers as well. thegovernment has} a high—rise and announced a high—rise enquiry and audit of other high—rise is across country to try to check whether the country to try to check whether they have been refurbished and, indeed, refurbished with this iheeee. refureiehee mththie ' iheeee refureiehee mththie ' the ii1eeee refureiehee mththie ' the sun will go down cladding. the sun will go down shortly - over the shell of
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shortly here over the shell of g re nfell tower shortly here over the shell of grenfell tower but these protesters show, at the moment, no sign of '$ anywhere. thank you very much going anywhere. thank you very much indeed. a lot of allegations, a lot of accusations, but those of course of accusations. but those of coarse be by the full will be investigated by the full public enquiry that the prime minister has announced, the public enquiry into the grenfell tower an use. see {eeeeeetl t‘; ~— —— — ,. ,, clearly, just another disaster. but clearly, just another symptom of the real anger that there is them on the well, symptom of the real anger that there is them on the - well, police toda there was nothin to said today there was nothing to suggest the fire - broke out in early hours of wednesday morning the early hours of wednesday morning was started deliberately. investigators are still trying to piece together what happened and how the blaze spread so quickly the building. there are throughout the building. there are now three enquiries altogether. the police, the fire brigade and the full public enquiry that we have mentioned. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds
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now on the questions the inquiry will have to consider. my mate told me 20 minutes ago that grenfell tower is on fire. !t is the first. obvious uuestiohe j ,,, w le. jjj this video was shot 20 minutes after the fire started. where? how? i saw someone come running out of flat 16 on the phone, calling for the fire brigade. he said it was a fridge fire. his fridge was by his kitchen window, so when the fire brigade put to the cladding on the outside, and the wind has helped it. all of a sudden, the cladding court. he said the cladding caught, which leads to question number two. it should not have. the building was re—clad with aluminium panels in 2016, the work signed off by the council. so far there is no evidence that standards were breached, but... the regulations are a minimum safety
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standard expected for a building, to keep it reasonably safe for the occupants and people around it. if you are using materials, or using it in circumstances that you know are more dangerous, then you have to mitigate that, make a risk assessment and engineer out the risk. in this test, the fire is contained by flameproof walls. experts say that good fire safety results from good design. so was the redesign to grenfell tower safe? were there other factors? after the work was completed, gas pipes were moved to public areas. residents were furious. thejob of finding out who might be to blame has now been taken over by the police. what we will do with the investigation is we will get to the answer of what has happened and why. that is why the police have taken the lead for the investigation, and if criminal offences have been committed, we will investigate that. examining the wreckage willjust be the start. building managers, contractors,
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subcontractors, a vast job. for the public enquiry, but for now, across the country, this is luton, councils are checking fire safety procedures and refurbishment work. deaths in fires are rare. just 229 people were killed at home last year. another question for the public enquiry, because there have been plenty of warnings in the past. cladding was a factor in this fire in southwark in 2009. but introducing them widely might mean a new approach to fire safety. something for the enquiry to consider. the 19705 era grenfell tower was designed simply to contain the spread of flames, what is called passive fire safety. but all of these modern developments will have fire detection systems and sprinklers,
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bringing those older blocks up to this sort of standard would not be cheap, and it would certainly be disruptive for their residents. but what price should be put on a life? eeeeciallti en thie’l‘—.i§ee often the poorest in society? this disaster has triggered a national debate which could last years. let's just show you again, well, there's currently two demonstrations over what happened at grenfell tower, one right near the tower and this one in central london, another demonstration and protesters again with bowers saying, justice for g re nfell with bowers saying, justice for grenfell —— with banners saying,
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justice for grenfell. there is the commission of enquiry announced by the government but one of —— many of the government but one of —— many of the protesters wanting answers perhaps more quickly than the enquiry will be able to provide and also wanting a fast identification of the dead and assurances about the rehousing of those made homeless by the disaster. that is the other demonstration currently in west london, just a few hundred yards from the burnt out carcass of g re nfell tower. what do we want? justice. - do we wa nt what do we want? justice. - do we want it? now. residents of another tower block refurbished by the company who refurbished grenfell tower have expressed their concern. rydon construction fitted thermal external cladding
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to five tower blocks in the chalcot estate in camden. the company said its work met all building and fire regulations. camden council said it had a robust fire safety policy and was carrying out extra safety checks on the cladding. endless questions, few answers. the anger now is palpable but the concerns have been raised for five yea rs concerns have been raised for five years in online blogs. posts from g re nfell years in online blogs. posts from grenfell residents have highlighted what they claimed was a genuine failure to check and maintain fire safety equipment, blaming an ongoing culture of negligence and damning evidence of neglect. - say it's a evidence of neglect. they say it's a truly terrifying thought but only a catastrophic event will demonstrate this. nigel lives in an identical eee faéel teee 'e ee eeeeeet eee feeet teee 'e ee eeeeeet ‘ block. 0ver many years, he has tower blockoaver manyryears, he has? similar concerns from raised similar concerns from residents. so, is this a fire door? this is a fire door. very old. there
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are 165 flats in these buildings. there are residents - an there are residents with an extending —— expanding family who had to use the broom cupboard have had to use the broom cupboard asa have had to use the broom cupboard as a makeshift bedroom. there was a period of time that these were unusable because these had totally unusable because these had broken into the building and actually stole all of the - metal. actually stole all of the raw metal. hi. monica lives on the 19th floor and watched as the fire took hold.|j feel shaken. i can't sleep at night. ijust think if anything, north —— no one will come to save us. the residents there said they were raising lots of concerns, lots of worries. you have been doing the same. do you feel they have listened? no. there is so much contradiction on this. on hearing the fire alarm, leave the building by blank route. there is no fire alarm. it says to use
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ele; eeeeeieeeeeee'eeeee i've never seen any provided. i've never seen any appliances, no fire extinguishers. firefighters have always worked with communities to clarify procedures but the union says that has been scaled back. firefighting is not just about going to fires and pointing it out and putting it out, there is a lot of safety work, prevention work, going into the community and teaching people about fires, doing inspections, home safety visits and things like that. safety visits and things likethat - is no doubt that the huge cuts there is no doubt that the huge cuts that have been visited upon the fire service, particularly in london over the next ten —— last ten years, have had an impact. there is suspicion, too, that a public enquiry closely controlled by. government might controlled by the government might not really get to the bottom of what happened. we have to be very concerned as to why we are going down a public enquiry read when we have hundreds of years of system in place of an inquest which, with a high courtjudge, place of an inquest which, with a high court judge, appointed place of an inquest which, with a high courtjudge, appointed as a coroner, can deal with it openly and
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transparently. it's really important when not left waiting for two, three, four years before we get we need answers now. what answers. we need answers now. what i'm asking is for an interim response to the enquiry this summer. we need to make sure local residents and families have proper representation and they are given legal representation. we need to legal representation. we needtcr sure that if there is any make sure that if there is any individual or organisation responsible, they are criminally prosecuted. theresa may visited the site this evening but left quickly after a crowd descended charting, coward, and, shame on you. there is a lot to do to win back the trust of this devastated community. the headlines on bbc news: protesters storm kensington and chelsea town hall amid growing calls for justice following the grenfell tower inferno. police confirm 30 people are now known to have died in the disaster. the bbc understands more than 70 people may be dead or missing in total. and the queen and prince william visit a relief centre where some
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of the hundreds left homeless are staying in temporary accommodation. let's just take a look at - of the day's other news now and a man has been arrested outside the houses of parliament on suspicion of having a knife. 0fficers used a taser to detain him and there were no injuries in the incident which happened close to the gate where 80 cup of —— a police constable was shot and killed during the terror attack in march. helmut kohl has died. he oversaw the reunification of germany. paying tribute, the current chancellor described him as a great german and a great european. british airways cabin crew are to stage a two—week strike in a
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long—running dispute over pay and travel concessions. members of the unite union will walk out between saturdayjuly the 16th. bae said the proposed action was extreme and com pletely proposed action was extreme and completely unnecessary. 0ne completely unnecessary. one other story is that a second soldier has died after being wounded in an incident involving a tank in an armyfiring in an incident involving a tank in an army firing range in pembrokeshire. two other soldiers we re pembrokeshire. two other soldiers were killed at castlemartin rangers. flags lowered to half—mast at castlemartin as a mark of respect for the two soldiers who died. two others were seriously injured during a training exercise carried out here by the wiltshire—based royal tank regiment on wednesday. inevitably, because they are trying to get as close as
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possible to the real experience of testing and firing their weaponry, there is a danger element, a risk element, attached to that. this just serves to remind us that, as i say, these guys put themselves in this _ basis. used for tank training, where live firing exercises can take place. it is understood this incident involved ammunition. what happened here is being investigated by the ministry of defence together with dyfed—powys police and the health and safety executive. for the moment, tank live firing at castlemartin has been suspended as a precaution. the ministry of defence has not yet released any information 0ne soldier died in hospital, his family by his bedside. they have asked for privacy before any details are made known. sian lloyd, bbc news, pembrokeshire. a service is being held at southwark cathedral
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in the wake of the terrorist attack on london bridge nearly two weeks ago. the service of hope, as it's being called, had been attended by survivors and theirfamilies, and members of the emergency services. 0ur religious affairs correspondent martin bashir is outside southwark cathedral. the dean of southwark cathedral has said that while they were at the centre of those horrific events on june the 3rd, today's service is an opportunity for southwark cathedral to re—establish itself as a place of reconciliation, healing and it's also an opportunity community. it's also an opportunity to honour those whose lives were impacted by what happened. 0f course, those near 50 people who we re course, those near 50 people who were taken to five local hospitals those eight individuals who lost and those eight individuals who lost their lives. eight people who, by their lives. eight people who, by their own countries of origin, r.n. indication of how london is a multicultural city, coming from
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australia, spain, france and, of course, great britain. the archbishop of canterbury is preaching and he says, in his sermon, preaching and he says, in his sermon, we are here preaching and he says, in his sermon, we are here in this building which was built to say that the feature that each of us has in christ is one of life, of hope, and, eventually, they hard it may be to see today, joy. he concludes, hope flowers in the desert of suffering when it is watered by communities of love. included in the congregation is the home secretary, amber rudd, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, and representing her majesty the queen, the countess of wessex. that was martin bashir, our religious affairs correspondent. let's take you back to our main news, the reaction to the fire at grenfell tower in west london. 2a people, we know, are still in hospital and 12 of them are still in hospital and 12 of them are still critically ill. for hospital staff, it has been obviously an
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incredibly busy time and a very difficult time treating the victims of burns and smoke inhalation. our health editor hugh pym has been talking to two members staff who treated victims through wednesday night. siren. king's college hospital, one of london's major trauma centres, its staff on the front line of the nhs response to the traumatic and horrific aftermath of the westminster and london bridge attacks, and this week grenfell tower. doctor tom best arrived in the early hours of wednesday. the urgent task was to clear the airways of victims of smoke inhalation and then the particles in their lungs. we found and lots of soot lining the lungs. some of that was quite hot when it got into the lungs, and so there were some burns underneath. we washed out as much of that soot as we possibly could to remove it. the emotion at the end of a punishing week is raw. it's...
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sorry. on a professional level, i feel immensely proud, but there is something so enormous about what's happened is that it's impossible to comprehend. for most staff, there was a need to care for families in distress as well as the patients themselves. how did you feel at the end of your shift? it's really tough. i think when you're working, you just powered through a bit and it's only when you step back and you finish at the end of the day that you realise how upsetting it can be, sorry, dealing with some of these things. it was really tough. the nhs in london has had to cope with two major incidents in the space of less than a fortnight, and just to illustrate the ongoing challenge, they are still treating patients here from the london bridge attack as well as those who came in during the early hours of wednesday morning.
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many staff have been involved in the emergency response both times. as we've been reporting, there are a couple of demonstrations under way at the moment in protest of what happened at grenfell tower and demonstrators demanding justice, as they say, and answers to a whole series of questions about how the disaster happened. this is one protest in central london. there's another one closer to the tower block in north kensington as well and there you can see people with their placards and banners. that followed a more dramatic protest earlier run at kensington town hall when several hundred protesters gathered, again demanding answers, and some of them actually storming inside the building of kensington town hall earlier run this afternoon
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and there were some scuffles. so, to demonstrations under way this evening. let's get a look at the weather now before much money is at the top of the hour. hello. the weekend is fast approaching and for those of you who haven't already heard, we are heading for a decent, summerlike weekend. very warm, in fact hot for some, with the humidity building as well and lots of sunshine in this story, as well. the reason being the wind direction coming from the south—west, driving in warm weather from the azores. temperatures from spain in the mid—40s over the weekend, mid—30s in france, and we could potentially see 30 degrees which we haven't seen since last september. high—pressure very much setting the scene across the uk this weekend. this weather butjust toppling over the top of that type. that's what we've seen today and it's been cloudy and disappointing there was in the south—eastern parts of central and southern england, blue sky and sunshine. a little bit
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fresher today, perhaps more co mforta ble fresher today, perhaps more comfortable for many, but temperatures not falling far at all overnight. it will be a quiet night, largely dry, we keep that feed of moist air largely dry, we keep that feed of moistairup to largely dry, we keep that feed of moist air up to the north west of scotland, driving in some drizzle and misty conditions here. 0vernight lows of 11 to 17 degrees. more uncomfortable if you are trying to get a decent night ‘s sheep. very early on, the temperatures will rocket up as we go through the day on saturday. again, that fund not moving very far very fast and again giving that feed of cloud and drizzly rain. the cloud should break up drizzly rain. the cloud should break up into eastern scotland, said temperatures responding here. 23 degrees in aberdeen. similar story in northern ireland. we are likely to see mid—20s against —— across the north—west and north—east. they could be refreshing sea breezes at the coast but inland you could see 27, 20 the coast but inland you could see 27,20 8 degrees, the coast but inland you could see 27, 20 8 degrees, that's the low 80s in terms of fahrenheit and just a light breeze inland. it will get
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quite hot and eventually quite humid. certainly worth bearing in mind if you are spinning any length of time outside that tv will be quite high if not very high, quite unusual across the uk and certainly worth bearing in mind. not much change for sunday. that front still sitting in the north—west affecting the deal here but elsewhere the heat continues to build and the humidity will build comity. 30 degrees is the mid—80s in terms of fahrenheit. we keep those temperatures perhaps on monday, slightly fresher by tuesday. this is bbc news, the headlines at 8pm. protesters storm kensington
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and chelsea town hall as emotions run high following the grenfell tower inferno. they are demanding answers as to why the building went up in flames. it looks like people are actually trying to get in to the council... to make their point directly. we are in the richest borough in the uk. and in this very borough we have a building where some of the poorest people live. and the safety measures are totally inadequate. this is the scene right now at another demonstration in oxford circus. demonstrators angry at
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